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Lewis Kent

Male 1792 - 1865  (72 years)


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  • Name Lewis Kent  [1
    Gender Male 
    Born 10 November 1792  New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 2, 3
    Residence(s) 1820-1841: Palmyra, Wayne Co., New York
    1841-60: SW ¼ of the NE ¼ of Sect 25, Alaiedon twp, Ingham Co., MI  [2, 4, 5, 6
    Died 12 April 1865  Ingham, Ingham Co., Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Headstones Submit Headstone Photo Submit Headstone Photo 
    Person ID I9133  Angus Saline's Genealogy
    Last Modified 5 July 2013 

    Father Simeon Kent,   b. 2 February 1768, England, New Jersey, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 January 1851, Sodus, Wayne Co., New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 82 years) 
    Mother Helen Rebecca Anderson,   b. 19 April 1775, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 March 1835, Wayne Co., New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years) 
    Married Cayuga, Cayuga Co., New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  [3
    Family ID F36  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family/Spouse Rhoda Hopkins,   b. about 1796, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 January 1892, Okemos, Ingham Co., Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 96 years) 
    Children 
     1. Stephen Reeves Kent,   b. 5 September 1817, Sodus, Wayne Co., New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 August 1884, Okemos, Ingham Co., Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 66 years)
     2. Mary E. Kent,   b. about 1825, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 October 1902, Mason, Ingham Co., Michigan, USA Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 77 years)
     3. Sarah R. Kent,   b. 7 September 1829, Palmyra, Wayne Co., New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. August 1900  (Age 70 years)
     4. George A. Kent,   b. about 1831, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 14 August 1864  (Age ~ 33 years)
    +5. John L. Kent,   b. about 1835, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. before 1867  (Age ~ 31 years)
    Family ID F6361  Family Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Lewis Kent arrived in Alaiedon township, Ingham Co. in 1841 and lived in section 25. His land entry is dated Aug. 31, 1841. The BLM website shows he purchase the following property in Ingham Co.:
      Sec. 23, W1/2 SW1/4, 10/10/1853, 80 acres under the Scrip Warrant Act of 1850 for being a private and sergeant in Captain Jenning’s and Clarke’s Companies, New York Militia, War of 1812.
      Sec. 25, N1/2 NE1/4, 6/1/1845, 80 acres
      Sec. 25, SW1/4 NE1/4, 6/15/1854, 40 acres

      Lewis Kent was awarded a maximum of 85 acres in Macedon, Michigan, Claim No. 3180, New York Military Equipment Claims.

      This is not the Lewis Kent, aka John D Kent, SO 33595.

      “The following reminscences were written, about 1850, by Archer Galloway, a veteran of the War of 1812. The manuscript has since been preserved unpublished by his family. For its present use acknowledgment is made to Mr. Milford Galloway, of Palmyra, New York.
      Archer Galloway was born in Newtown, now Elmira, in 1790. In that year the family moved to the vicinity of what is now Palmyra, N. Y., where Archer spent his youth on a frontier farm. He enlisted at 22. After the war he bought and drove cattle to the Philadelphia market, kept a store, and engaged in various occupations. He married, and in 1838 moved to Reading, Mich., where he built the first frame house in the neighborhood, and continued for many years as surveyor and farmer. He died in 1864. The following narrative is given as far as possible in his own language, though parts of it are abridged and condensed:
      I know of but two men now living, beside myself, who were engaged in the war of 1812 [on the Niagara]. They are Maj. Gen. Scott, and Lewis Kent, now living in Ingham Co., this State [Mich.]. War was declared June 18, 1812, but as early as April of that year Gov. Tompkins of New York ordered two companies of volunteers to be raised in Seneca and Ontario Counties, and to proceed immediately to Fort Niagara. We volunteered for one year; and on the 18th of May the two companies, one commanded by Capt. Elias Hall, the other by Capt. Samuel Jennings, left Canandaigua for the frontier. The most frequent incident on the march out was that we had very frequently to lift our baggage wagons out of the mire, for the country was entirely new and muddy. I think we were eleven days in getting to Fort Niagara.
      From this time on until the news of the declaration of war was received, our time was spent in preparations for the coming struggle. Batteries were erected at Lewiston and other points, guns mounted, etc.; but, oh, how memorable was the day on which the news of the declaration of war arrived--and strange to say the British received it two hours before we did, and what a commotion and kciking up of dust by them! It was a caution to young soldiers like ourselves, and it appeared to us that they were literally running crazy.
      By and by an express came cantering along for our post, ...

      Mr. Seward presented the petition of James A. Galloway and Lewis Kent, praying that pensions may be allowed the soldiers of the war of 1812; which was referred to the Committee on Pensions.

      lives next to Seth H. Kent in 1850. Seth was a taxpayer in Alaidon twp in 1844.

      James A. Kent, one of the early settlers of Kalamazoo and one of the city’s best known citizens and business men, was born near East Palmyra, Wayne Co., New York, on March 17, 1835. His parents were Lawrence and Rachael Kent, the former a native of New York and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father was a farmer and passed his life in Wayne county, New York. The family was of English descent, Mr. Kent’s grandfather, Simeon Kent, having been born in England and come to this country about the close of the Revolutionary war. He enlisted in the United States army for the war of 1812, but was not called into active service. James A. Kent is one of four sons and four daughters born to his parents, all yet living, but none except himself in Kalamazoo. He grew to manhood and was educated in his native county, and after leaving school was apprenticed to a carpenter, serving an apprenticeship of four years. In the fall of 1856 he became a resident of Kalamazoo and went to work at his trade for Dewing & Scudder. At the end of a year in their employ, he formed a partnership wth Mr. Dewing under the name of Dewing & Kent, which lasted fifteen years. He then began business on his own account by superintending the erection of many of the best residences in Kalamazoo, Jackson and other cities to which he was called for similar work, and he kept at this line of duty until 1900, when he retired from active pursuits. In 1861, he was married in Kalamazoo to Miss Charlotte Wolcott, a daughter of William Wolcott a pioneer of Lewanee county. The had one son and three daughters. Their mother died in 1871, and in June 1877, Mr. Kent married her sister, Miss Mary J. Wolcott, whose father came to this county from Lewanee county in 1857,

      The following is also take from the work of Margaret Shapley )

      "The story of the Kent family has been pieced together from U.S. Census records of Ingham Co., County histories, preseved family letters, and personal recollections of present-day descendants. On-the -spot research in township and county records could fill in some of the blanks in the story.
      Lewis kent was born about 1793, his wife Rohada about 1795, in the state of New Jersey. Their eight children were born in New York state in the period 1817 - 1835. When the Kents arrived in Alaiedon Twp. in 1841, their household included the oldest son Seth, daughters Martha Jane, not yet 19, Sarah R., 12, young sons Georg, 10 and John, 8. With them also my have been "Uncle John," John Hopkings, listed with them in the 1850 census and shown as born in New Jersey about 1786.
      Her "mark" on a chattel mortgage is evedence that Rhoda was illiterate. Lewis, however, could express himself quite well in letters. In January 1854 he wrote to his daughter Jane Chapman and her husband Israel, then in Pennsylvania for an extended stay.
      In the letter he writes "I take this oppertunity of writing a few lines to inform you of times and things and maters in these parts of the country . He reported on family activites, the weather , prices, a road to be built, several deaths in the community including a suicide. "Death is in the land Children let us try to make that preparation which we shall need to gave when we are to try the test may it bee our happy lots for to give up our accounts with joy and not with grief."

      “From the Documentary History of the Campaign: Niagara Frontier in the Year 1812, Volume I, Part 1:
      Page 202-203: "Lieutenant Colonel Philetus Swift [LUTHER's colonel] to Governor Tompkins. Sir, I take the liberty to communicate to you my situation, and the situation of my regiment. I have about four hundred and seventy men, four hundred of whom are good and in high spirits; men that I am willing to risk my life for and with, and believe they are with me, but that is not enough for a regiment. Your knowledge of me will lead you to suppose that it would be pleasing o me to have an opportunity to do my country service, and if I may be allowed to enlist under the Act of the 6th of February last, two or three hundred men more as good as I now have, I should feel as if we could well tell in the place of danger.
      My regiment is all under the Act of Congress except Captain Jennings' company, which I should be glad to get rid of. I have put him under arrest for detaining pay from his men, which would have volunteered had he not advised them otherwise. Captain Joseph Wells, who commands a light infantry company in
      Buffalo, has been in service since the militia was called out in June by order of General Wadsworth. He now has 26 good men enlisted under the Act of Congress, and I believe could fill his company immediately had he orders from Your Excellency to that effect. He is now under my command and wishes to remain so; on those conditions the men have enlisted, that they belong to my regiment."

      From the Documentary History of the Campaign: Niagara Frontier in the Year
      1812, Volume I, Part 1:
      Page 226:
      “Captain Jennings [of Lieutenant Colonel Philetus Swift's regiment] has been
      tried by a court martial and found guilty of such charges as forfeited his
      commission, and I have approved the sentence. The proceedings in form will soon
      be forwarded to Your Excellency?”

      From the Documentary History of the Campaign: Niagara Frontier in the Year
      1812, Volume I, Part 1:
      Page 228-229:
      P. S.-The company of Captain Jennings in Colonel Swift's regiment [LUTHER's
      regiment] had become so clamorous for pay and contended so strenuously that
      their time had expired that I have ordered them to be discharged. I was
      strengthened in my belief that this would meet your approbation by learning
      from Brigadier General Brown that you had ordered Colonel Bellinger's regiment
      to be discharged." [1, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10]

  • Sources 
    1. [S2308] .

    2. [S2307] .

    3. [S2471] Jackson Family Tree.

    4. [S2451] (D. W. Ensign & Co (Philadelphia: 1880)).

    5. [S2306] .

    6. [S4] Lewis Kent U.S. Land Patent Duplicate.

    7. [S2513] .

    8. [S2514] (Buffalo Historical Society (Buffalo, N. Y.)).

    9. [S2516] (United States Congress, Washington DC (1859)).

    10. [S2515] Donna’s Family.



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